Intake of small fishes improving rural health indexes

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By Mamun Islam

RANGPUR, April 22, 2017 (BSS) – Increasing intake of micro-nutrient rich small fishes has been improving health indexes in recent years meeting nutritional demand of malnourished children, pregnant and lactating women in rural areas.

According to health experts, malnutrition of pregnant women, lactating mothers and children belonging to the poorer families in rural areas still remains as a major cause of permanent blindness, maternal, neonatal and infant deaths.

“Intake of micro-nutrient rich small fishes like “Mola”, “Darkina”, and “Dhela” meets nutritional demand of children, pregnant and lactating women in easily overcoming these severe problems,” said Rangpur Divisional Director (Health) Dr Mozammel Hossain.

Normal growth of brain, different organs and flourishing talent of the children generally face setback as a result of malnutrition of the pregnant women, lactating mothers and children leading to severe diseases, he said.

“So why, nutritional deficiency of pregnant women and lactating mothers and children must be overcome through ensuring intake of micro-nutrient rich small fishes and vegetables,” he added.

Noted physician Dr Mofizul Islam Mantu said nutritional deficiency of pregnant women and lactating mothers, babies and children among the poorer section people in rural areas is still a problem in building a healthier nation.

Gynecology Specialist at Rangpur Medical College and Hospital (RMCH) Dr Yeasmina said meeting nutritional demand of pregnant women, lactating mothers and children in rural areas is a perquisite for a healthier nation.

“Intake of small fishes and vegetables meets nutritional demand of the pregnant women ensuring safe pregnancy for giving birth to healthier babies and increases milk of the lactating mothers,” said Gynecology Specialist at RMCH Dr Kamrun Nahar.

According to Director of RMCH Dr Moudud Hossain Rabu, regular intake of micro-nutrient rich fishes strengthens immune systems of the babies and children helping their normal growth.

“The small fishes have adequate important minerals and vitamins like iron and folic acid those help healthier growth of brain, immune systems and flourishing talent of the children,” he added.

Noted child disease specialist Dr Shariful Islam said the common people generally do not include smaller fishes on food menu though deficit of micro- nutrient elements, minerals and vitamins could severely hinder normal growth of the children.

“Intake of micro-nutrient rich small fishes not only meets nutritional demand, but also substantially reduces the rate of maternal, neonatal and infant deaths and eliminates permanent blindness improving health indexes,” Dr Shariful added.

According to District Fisheries Officer of Rangpur Dr Zillur Rahman, small fish production has been increasing in smaller ponds, canals, wetlands and crop fields in recent years despite declining of water bodies in the northern region.

“The rural people are now achieving self-reliance along with ensuring intake of micro-nutrient rich fishes by the pregnant women, lactating mothers and children to overcome malnutrition following increase in production of small fishes,” he added.

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